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Dr. Meyers Talks to MedPage Today About the Need for Speedy Stroke Treatment

Photo of Dr. Philip Meyers

When it comes to treating a stroke, faster is definitely better.

Dr. Philip Meyers knows this well. He co-authored the standards for stroke intervention for the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery and has spent much of his career working for better stroke care.

He talked again recently about this need for fast stroke treatment when MedPage Today interviewed him about a study done by another researcher, Dr. Mayank Goyal of the University of Calgary. The study looked at how quickly patients were treated for strokes and compared treatment time to how well the patients recovered.

Dr. Meyers agrees with their findings. “We should hurry to treat [patients] as quickly as possible,” he said.

Many strokes happen because a blood clot blocks blood flow in the brain. The patient’s recovery depends on how quickly that blood flow can be restored.

In the Calgary study, doctors got the blood flowing again by doing a procedure called a thrombectomy—a procedure that Dr. Meyers commonly performs. The doctors inserted a small tube through the patient’s veins to the blood clot and then used the tube to deliver a tiny mechanical device to pull the clot out of the blood vessel.

The researchers in this study found that patients who were treated with this device had an excellent chance of coming out of the stroke with no major damage—if they were treated quickly. The best outcomes happened when the blood clot was removed and blood flow restored within 150 minutes of the first stroke symptoms.

This finding didn’t surprise Dr. Meyers. He told MedPage Today that the idea that it’s important to treat strokes as quickly as possible is as well accepted as “don’t drink and drive” and “don’t smoke cigarettes.”

According to Dr. Meyers, Dr. Goyal’s mantra is “time is brain,” and he couldn’t agree more.

Read the full article here.

Learn more about Dr. Meyers at his bio page here.

patient journey

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